Muslim’s Role in Promoting Interfaith Dialogue in Indonesia

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Islamic tradition has a glorious history of interfaith dialogue. Prophet of Islam, Muhammad (pbuh) has set many examples of dialogue, both verbal and written. The prophet (pbuh) entered into a dialogue both with the followers of revealed religions and idol worshippers. The prophetic dialogue was also accompanied with the establishment of a tradition of cooperation on common human grounds with followers of other religions. To institutionalize this cooperation, the prophet (pbuh) concluded written agreements with followers of different religions which can serve as models of cooperation and coexistence for the pluralist societies of today. We witness the first ever instance of the Prophet’s activism for cooperation with others in acts of goodness and to undo excesses and injustice, in Mecca, when he was yet to be bestowed with the prophethood. He (pbuh) became part of this agreement, called ‘Hilful Fudūl’, and accorded so much importance to it that even after he was granted prophethood. After migrating to Madina, the Prophet (pbuh) in order to establish peace, stability and a civil society based on human rights, concluded a deal with the Christians, Jews and mushrikīn (idol worshippers) which is recorded in history as mithāq-e-Madina (Madina Pact). The most striking feature of the Pact that has a very meaningful relevance to our own socio-political situation in this era of globalization. He has accepted all the religious entities represented in the Pact as forming one single Ummah (people). The Madina Pact accepts religious freedom as a core value and right and guarantees equal rights and obligations of all the participants in the Pact in matters of the State. This also establishes the principle that the religious differences of a society or people do not put any obstacles in the affairs of the state and its defense against any external enemy. Read more in PDF – DOWNLAOD